International Journal of School Health

Published by: Kowsar

Assessing Ghanaian Teachers’ Perceptions and Beliefs Regarding Substance Use Among School-Aged Children in Ghana

Theresa Marie Hunter 1 , * , Cecilia Obeng 1 and Joseph Ogah 2
Authors Information
1 School of Public Health, Indiana University, Indiana, USA
2 Cape Coast University, Cape Coast, Ghana
Article information
  • International Journal of School Health: January 2017, 4 (1); e60242
  • Published Online: August 6, 2016
  • Article Type: Brief Report
  • Received: February 28, 2016
  • Revised: May 1, 2016
  • Accepted: June 2, 2016
  • DOI: 10.17795/intjsh-37256

To Cite: Hunter T M, Obeng C, Ogah J. Assessing Ghanaian Teachers’ Perceptions and Beliefs Regarding Substance Use Among School-Aged Children in Ghana, Int J School Health. 2017 ; 4(1):e60242. doi: 10.17795/intjsh-37256.

Abstract
Copyright © 2016, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits copy and redistribute the material just in noncommercial usages, provided the original work is properly cited.
1. Background
2. Objectives
3. Methods
4. Results
5. Discussion
Footnote
References
  • 1. Peltzer K. Prevalence and correlates of substance use among school children in six African countries. Int J Psychol. 2009; 44(5): 378-86
  • 2. Global school-based student health survey. 2012;
  • 3. The role of schools in combating substance abuse. Pediatrics. 1995; 95(5): 784-5
  • 4. Flay BR. Approaches to substance use prevention utilizing school curriculum plus social environment change. Addictive behav. 2000; 25(6): 861-85
  • 5. Cuijpers P. Effective ingredients of school-based drug prevention programs: A systematic review. Addictive Behav. 2002; 27(6): 1009-23
  • 6. Botvin GJ, Griffin KW. School-based programmes to prevent alcohol, tobacco and other drug use. Int Rev psychiat. 2007; 19(6): 607-15
  • 7. Adu-Mireku S. The prevalence of alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use among Ghanaian senior secondary students in an urban setting. Ethnicity Substance Abuse. 2003; 2(1): 53-65
  • 8. Kandel DB. Stages and pathways of drug involvement: Examining the gateway hypothesis. 2002;
  • 9. Anthony JC, Petronis KR. Early-onset drug use and risk of later drug problems. Drug Alcohol Depend. 1995; 40(1): 9-15
  • 10. Wilson N, Battistich V, Syme SL, Boyce W. Does elementary school alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use increase middle school risk? Adolescent Health. 2002; 30(6): 442-7
  • 11. Obot IS. Responding to substance use problems in Nigeria: The role of civil society organizations. Substance Use Misuse. 2004; 39(8): 1287-99
  • 12. Odejide AO. Status of drug use/abuse in Africa: A review. Int J Mental Health Addiction. 2006; 4(2): 87-102
  • 13. Grant BF, Dawson DA. Age at onset of alcohol use and its association with dsm-iv alcohol abuse and dependence: Results from the national longitudinal alcohol epidemiologic survey. Substance Abuse. 1997; 9: 103-10
  • 14. Lloyd C, Joyce R, Hurry J, Ashton M. The effectiveness of primary school drug education. Drugs: education, prevention and policy. 2000; 7(2): 109-26
  • 15. Botvin GJ, Griffin KW, Paul E, Macaulay AP. Preventing tobacco and alcohol use among elementary school students through life skills training. Child Adolescent Substance Abuse. 2003; 12(4): 1-17
Creative Commons License Except where otherwise noted, this work is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial 4.0 International License .

Search Relations:

Author(s):

Article(s):

Create Citiation Alert
via Google Reader

Readers' Comments